September 01, 87

Vol. 03 , No. 01   



THE DIRECTOR'S CORNER
JIL STARK

Welcome to another year at Claremont McKenna College and the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum. We have planned a number of stimulating programs for 1987-88, and I hope you will become a regular participant in the events at the Athenaeum.

Everyone at CMC is invited to our programs. For the benefit of new students, remember that when you sign up at the Athenaeum and give us your meal card number, this means you will not be able to eat at Collins Hall unless we call the food service and reinstate your number. We can do that the day of the event. So call us if your plans change.

If you have ideas for an interesting program, please stop by the Athenaeum and see me. Our student fellows are Stephanie Lum, and James Van Beek, the faculty fellow is John Roth, and the manager is David Edwards. All of us welcome your contributions.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
JAMES VAN BEEK

In featuring Olympic athletes to novelists, Mozart concerti to Bourbon Street jazz, and pretzels to wienerschnitzel, the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum again provides students and faculty alike with a forum for the exchange and exploration of intellectual issues and cultural traditions. The Athenaeum exists for students, and therefore student input regarding programs is especially desirable. As the new Athenaeum student fellows, both Stephanie Lum and I would appreciate receiving any suggestions from the student body.

This past summer I have worked in the CMC admission office. Presently I look forward to continuing my work there, as well as taking up my responsibilities as an Athenaeum student fellow. As far as studying is concerned, I will pursue my interests in literature and government while finishing my general education requirements.

Among my goals as a student fellow is to encourage interaction among faculty and students by means of Athenaeum events. In each issue of The Fortnightly, there are reservation slips for upcoming events. If you are interested in any of them, I urge you to fill out the slips and bring them to the Athenaeum prior to the reservation deadline dates. Some events, such as the afternoon teas and the Wednesday lunches, require no reservations and are open to all students. Take advantage of these occasions to invite professors and fellow students to meet for conversation. Remember, the Athenaeum is yours, and please contact me with any suggestions you may have concerning future events. My room number is Appleby 102. You can reach me there or at the Athenaeum.




Campus Life: Undergraduate Culture from the End of the Eighteenth Century to Present
HELEN HOROWITZ
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1987

We are eager to introduce freshmen to the Athenaeum. With this in mind, a special served dinner is planned in their honor. All freshmen will automatically be signed up for this event, but if you prefer not to attend, please call x8244, so that you can eat in Collins Hall.

Helen Horowitz, the evening's speaker, is the author of the widely acclaimed book, Campus Life: Undergraduate Culture from the End of the Eighteenth Century to Present (1987), published by Alfred A. Knopf. In it she suggests that every generation of college students presents an enigma to faculty and administrators, parents, as well as society in general. Dr. Horowitz, professor of history at the University of Southern California, sees today's campus as dominated by a new breed of students driven by career concerns. We invite you to question Dr. Horowitz's ideas.

Prior to Dr. Horowitz's discussion, cheese and cold drinks will be served from 5:00-6:00 p.m. Dinner follows-all our meals are homemade right in the Athenaeum's kitchen-and Professor Horowitz will speak at 7:00 p.m. As is usually the case at the Athenaeum, the evening's program concludes at 8:00 p.m.




Balanced Force Reduction
GUENTER JOETZE
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1987

In the post-World War 11 era, the United States and Western Europe have been much concerned about armed conflict with the Soviet Union. These concerns have produced a number of negotiations. One of them, the Vienna Mutual and Balanced Force Reduction (MBFR) negotiations, promotes the notion of reducing the chances of conventional armies confronting one another. Presently a key player in those talks is Ambassador Guenter Joetze, whose visit is sponsored by CMC's Keck Center for International Strategic Studies.

Ambassador Joetze has headed the MBFR delegation from the Federal Republic of Germany since January 1987. Prior to that he served as the Federal Republic's consul general in Los Angeles. Ambassador Joetze will be the Athenaeum's guest on Wednesday evening, September 9. Come to hear this distinguished diplomat. His talk begins at 7:00 p.m., preceded by an Athenaeum reception and dinner starting at 5:30 p.m. Reservation coupons are available in The Fortnightly.




An Alternative to Star Wars
JACK MERRITT
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1987

Jack Merritt, emeritus professor of physics at CMC, who has done extensive work on nuclear strategy and arms control, issues the following invitation for an evening of discussion (which begins with an Athenaeum reception and dinner at 5:30 p.m.):

"Come to a progress report on the problems of shifting from nuclear deterrence by threat of offensive retaliation to deterrence by defense. Last spring I gave an Athenaeum talk outlining a possible path from today's MAD world to deterrence by defenses. The talk was based on a short article written by my son and myself."

"Late this spring we sent the article out for comment to about 20 experts. Included in the group were former Secretary of Defense Harold Brown; Ambassador Gerard Smith, who negotiated the ABM; Gen. Brent Scowcroft, former National Security Adviser to President Ford; and Dr. Robert Cooper. I will report on our current views in light of their comments."

Use the reservation coupon in this Fortnightly to sign up.




Oz on the Pacific: Los Angeles in the 1920s
KEVIN STARR
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1987

This semester the noted California historian, Kevin Starr, who delivered CMC's excellent 40th birthday convocation address last autumn, gives three Athenaeum talks on California history. The first in this series, "0z on the Pacific: Los Angeles in the 1920s," occurs at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 15, following a reception and dinner at the Athenaeum beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Raised in San Francisco, Starr took his Ph.D. at Harvard University. He has taught there, as well as at the University of California at Berkeley and at Davis, and is currently a visiting scholar at the Hoover Institution. Kevin Starr's books include Americans and the California Dream, 1850-1915 (1973) and most recently Inventing the Dream: California Through the Progressive Era (1985).




Church, State, and Liberty
LEONARD LEVY
THURSDAY,SEPTEMBER 17, 1987

The American Founding As the Best Regime: The Bonding of Civil and Religious Liberty
HARRY JAFFA
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER, 17, 1987 8:15 p.m. Bauer Lecture Hall

The 200th anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution occurs Thursday, September 17. The Athenaeum commemorates that historic event with the first in a series of celebrations to honor the Constitution's bicentennial.

At 7:00 p.m. on the anniversary date, Leonard Levy, professor of history at The Claremont Graduate School, Pulitzer prize-winning author, authority on the First Amendment, and recently a star on Bill Moyers' television series about the Constitution-speaks on "Church, State, and Liberty." Preceding his discussion is a special Colonial Birthday Dinner. Authentic 18th-century music will be provided by Mary Beth Haag and Paul Bishop. Use The Fortnightly's reservation coupon to sign up for this event, which begins with a 5:30 p.m. reception, followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m.

If you wish to hear more about the Constitution on this anniversary evening, CMC's Professor Harry V. Jaffa is speaking at 8:15 p.m. in Bauer Lecture Hall. His lecture, "The American Founding As the Best Regime: The Bonding of Civil and Religious Liberty," is co-sponsored by The Henry Salvatori Center for the Study of Individual Freedom in the Modern World and by The Claremont Institute.

Watch The Fortnightly for further announcements about events in the Athenaeum's 1987-88 observance of the Constitution's birthday.




Politics in Athletics
SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 1, 1987

Save these dates for an Athenaeum symposium featuring sports personalities such as: Rhodes scholar Pat Haden, Olympic volleyball star Karch Kiraly, Celtics guard Conner Henry, soccer professional Ricky Davis, television sports commentator Roy Firestone, and NFL draft agent Mel Levine. Details follow in the next Fortnightly.




FUTURE ATHENAEUM EVENTS:

October

Sunday, October 4, 1987:
First 1987-88 Athenaeum brunch

Monday, October 5, 1987:
William Bradford, second speaker in the U.S. Constitution

Wednesday, October 14, 1987:
Second lecture in Kevin Starr's series on California history

Tuesday-Wednesday, October 27-28, 1987:
John Irving, novelist

November

Sunday, November 1, 1987:
Athenaeum brunch

Tuesday-Thursday, November 3-5, 1987:
Symposium on "The 40th Anniversary of the Marshal Plan"

Monday, November 9:
Luce Foundation lecturer Ron Kling

Monday-Thursday, November 9-12, 1987:
Irving Howe, author, literary critic, 1987 fellow at CMC's Center for Humanistic Studies

Wednesday, November 11, 1987:
Dinner with chamber music by Lew Ellenhorn, Bonnie Snortum, and Elmer Tolsted

Friday-Saturday, November 13-14, 1987:
Symposium on "What Is Political Economy?" including Allan Bloom, author of the best-selling book, The Closing of the American Mind (1988)

Monday, November 16, 1987:
Al Malabre, economics editor for The Wall Street Journal

Tuesday, November 17, 1987:
Martin Marty, senior editor of The Christian Century and third speaker in the U.S. Constitution series

Wednesday, November 18, 1987:
Third lecture in Kevin Starr's series on California history

Thursday, November 19, 1987:
Stan Rosen, authority about China

December

Tuesday, December 1, 1987:
Special madrigal dinner for CMC students, faculty, and staff. The occasion includes the madrigal feast with singing by the Concert Choir during the meal; however, there will be no concert following the feast. (You and one guest may attend for $5.00.)

Wednesday, Friday, and Tuesday, December 2, 4, and 8, 1987:
Madrigal dinners and concerts. (A special madrigal dinner for Res Publica donors is scheduled for Sunday, December 6, 1987.)

*Specific details and times for these and other forthcoming Athenaeum events will appear on later issues of The Fortnightly.




OTHER ATHENAEUM EVENTS

Afternoon Tea. Beginning Monday, September 7, 1987, and every Monday through Friday thereafter, tea and sweets are offered in the Athenaeum library, 3:00-4:30 p.m.

The Wednesday Lunch. Beginning September 9, 1987, one of the small Athenaeum dining rooms will be reserved each Wednesday for students and faculty who wish to drop in for lunch and conversation. No prior sign-up is required.

Sunday Brunch. Beginning Sunday, October 4, 1987, and on the first Sunday of each month thereafter, the Athenaeum serves its famous Sunday brunch. Make reservations early.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
JAMES VAN BEEK '90

In featuring Olympic athletes to novelists, Mozart concerti to Bourbon Street jazz, and pretzels to wienerschnitzel, the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum again provides students and faculty alike with a forum for the exchange and exploration of intellectual issues and cultural traditions. The Athenaeum exists for students, and therefore student input regarding programs is especially desirable. As the new Athenaeum student fellows, both Stephanie Lum and I would appreciate receiving any suggestions from the student body.

This past summer I have worked in the CMC admission office. Presently I look forward to continuing my work there, as well as taking up my responsibilities as an Athenaeum student fellow. As far as studying is concerned, I will pursue my interests in literature and government while finishing my general education requirements.

Among my goals as a student fellow is to encourage interaction among faculty and students by means of Athenaeum events. In each issue of The Fortnightly, there are reservation slips for upcoming events. If you are interested in any of them, I urge you to fill out the slips and bring them to the Athenaeum prior to the reservation deadline dates. Some events, such as the afternoon teas and the Wednesday lunches, require no reservations and are open to all students. Take advantage of these occasions to invite professors and fellow students to meet for conversation. Remember, the Athenaeum is yours, and please contact me with any suggestions you may have concerning future events. My room number is Appleby 102. You can reach me there or at the Athenaeum.

STEPHANIE LUM '88

As the fall semester gains momentum, remember that the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum continues to offer numerous opportunities for you to step away from daily pressures. Here you can encounter ideas and experiences that are often new, controversial, or simply refreshing. This month the Athenaeum's "Power and Politics in Athletics" symposium is sure to give you a different outlook on the concerns of players and personalities in the highly publicized world of professional and collegiate athletics.

Other events not to miss are continuations of the United States Constitution lecture series, currently spotlighting William Bradford, and the series about California history, featuring Kevin Starr. Both series continue in November. Watch The Fortnightly to catch every episode.

Being a student fellow, I look forward to attending as many Athenaeum-sponsored events as possible, and I hope that you will do the same. Remember that an additional goal for the Athenaeum is to accommodate as many student-sponsored events as possible, but please keep in mind that we often have more scheduling flexibility for lunches and teas than for dinners.

Also, there are many work opportunities the Athenaeum offers to enterprising students; our master chef, Terri, is presently looking for good workers in the kitchen to keep operations running smoothly.

Most of all, I stress that while our programs for the year will encompass a broad range of interests in an effort to appeal to you, if you feel that we are overlooking a topic or theme, please contact me or James Van Beek at the Athenaeum, x8244. We are always open to your comments and suggestions.